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Dengue Fever

Dengue Fever

Dengue Fever disease used to be called "break-bone" fever because it sometimes causes severe joint and muscle pain that feels like bones are breaking, hence the name. Dengue is not contagious from person to person. You become infected by being bitten by the Aedes species mosquito which unlike other mosquito species, bites during the day.

Dengue Fever has flu-like symptoms with headaches and fever, eye pain, backache, and joint pains. Some people also get rashes and vomit these symptoms can last 2 to 3 days and an infected person may feel tired for up to 3 months.

There are four types of dengue virus: DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4.In addition to typical dengue, there are dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome
The condition is rarely fatal but there is one form of the disease, Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF). DHF is often characterised by the same symptoms but in addition there will be marked damage to blood and lymph vessels as well as bleeding from the nose, gums, or under the skin, causing purplish bruises. This form of dengue disease can cause death.

The Symptoms of dengue shock syndrome which is the most severe form of dengue disease, includes all of the symptoms of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever, but in addition there will be fluids leaking outside of blood vessels , which leads to massive internal bleeding and the patient will go into shock.This form of the disease usually occurs in children (sometimes adults) experiencing their second dengue infection. It is sometimes fatal, especially in children and young adults.

There is currently no vaccine for this disease most people you will recover completely within 2 weeks, treatment should include painkillers but it is recommended that Aspirin should not be taken. Travellers should use insect repellents which contain DEET and wear long sleeved shirts and trousers while in high risk areas to try and avoid being bitten.

It is now endemic in more than 100 countries in Africa, Caribbean, Central and South America, Middle East, South-east Asia, India, China, Australia and the South and Central Pacific.

Please Note: The information provided here should not be used for diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A medical practitioner should always be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of all medical conditions.

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